A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes #2020

A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes By Adam Rutherford A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived The Stories in Our Genes This is a story about you It is the history of who you are and how you came to be It is unique to you as it is to each of the billion modern humans who have ever drawn breath But it is also our c
  • Title: A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes
  • Author: Adam Rutherford
  • ISBN: 9780297609377
  • Page: 317
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes By Adam Rutherford This is a story about you.It is the history of who you are and how you came to be It is unique to you, as it is to each of the 100 billion modern humans who have ever drawn breath But it is also our collective story, because in every one of our genomes we each carry the history of our species births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration and a lot of sex.Since scientThis is a story about you.It is the history of who you are and how you came to be It is unique to you, as it is to each of the 100 billion modern humans who have ever drawn breath But it is also our collective story, because in every one of our genomes we each carry the history of our species births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration and a lot of sex.Since scientists first read the human genome in 2001 it has been subject to all sorts of claims, counterclaims and myths In fact, as Adam Rutherford explains, our genomes should be read not as instruction manuals, but as epic poems DNA determines far less than we have been led to believe about us as individuals, but vastly about us as a species.In this captivating journey through the expanding landscape of genetics, Adam Rutherford reveals what our genes now tell us about history, and what history tells us about our genes From Neanderthals to murder, from redheads to race, dead kings to plague, evolution to epigenetics, this is a demystifying and illuminating new portrait of who we are and how we came to be.
    A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes By Adam Rutherford

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      Adam Rutherford Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes book, this is one of the most wanted Adam Rutherford author readers around the world.

    635 thoughts on “A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes”

    1. It s hard to find a modern book on race which will tell you what is the current scientific thinking, given the remarkable progress of genetics and the unravelling of the human genome and all that There are a thousand books on racism, but hardly any on race Isn t that curious I believe that may be because scientists realise it s a hornet s nest and they prefer not to stick their heads in.I recently heard of Nicholas Wade s A Troubling Inheritance 2014 but before I got to that one I found this one [...]


    2. The stories of our genes have been all over publishing right now and this is one of the best examples of how scientists can make complex subjects interesting, relevant, and fun Adam Rutherford reads his own work, something I particularly love as it enables the author to convey the passion and enthusiasm they hold for their subject in a way that no narrator can match And he s funny with it too It s one of those listening experiences where you end up feeling like you ve learnt something but had a [...]


    3. My thanks go out to NetGalley and The Experiment for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.Marvellous book, and I couldn t get enough of it The author does a great job rounding up exactly what makes us, humans, unique and at the same time homogeneous My favourite sections were of course on our relation to other species of Hominids and the failed attempts by some scientists to show correlation between genetics and predisposal to criminal behaviour Written in an ac [...]


    4. Um timo review sobre a evolu o humana, desta vez pelo lado molecular da coisa Compila os ltimos achados de sequenciamento de genomas humanos e de humanos extintos Neandertais e Denisovanos , falando sobre como caiu o conceito de ra a, o que descobrimos sobre cor da pele, nossa fala, nosso c rebro e mais um mundo de coisas O ltimo livro que li nessa linha foi a biografia do Svante P bo, mas o P bo fica muito em torno dos neandertais s especialidade dele Enquanto este trata de humanos antigos sequ [...]


    5. It is really difficult for me to articulate my feelings after I had read this book I found this book fascinating in the first half which focused on what genes can tell us about the origin of our species, especially the bits discussing the evidence found in the genome of ancient remains The tone was very humorous and quite sarcastic and it was just a lot of fun Unfortunately, the second half focusing on race and where the actual science is heading in relation to the study of the human genome, was [...]


    6. There is no gene for evil Black people have no genetic predisposition to excel at sports Tay Sachs is not a Jewish disease Native Americans are not genetically predisposed to alcoholism And, of course, there is no such thing as a race in genetics These are a few of the many axes Adam Rutherford grinds in his ambitious new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived The Human Story Retold Through Our Genes.Rutherford s book consists of two parts Part One, How We Came to Be, lives up to the t [...]


    7. A very interesting read on genetics and the common mistakes that people make when thinking about DNA and its role in human life Filled with fun trivia information about the subject and weaved together with historical backgrounds on big personalities in the sciences or areas of research that we should all be familiar with Worth the read.


    8. Mini review in English Rese a completa en espa ol It must not be easy to write about the story in our genes, the genes of humankind, in a very accesible, highly gripping way, full of delightful british humour and nerdy references Yet in A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, Adam Rutherford achieves it, and makes you feel passionate about it Along a very ingenious drawn narration, from the beginning to the present, he touches such sensible topics as endogamy, racism really impressive chapte [...]


    9. Science books can sometimes be rather stuffy or prissy but no one can accuse Adam Rutherford of this In his exploration of the stories in our genes that word stories is foremost and Rutherford proves himself time and again to be an accomplished storyteller His style is sometimes extremely colloquial and very British so at one point, when referring to the way some people react to the smell of a particular steroid he says to many it honks like stale urine and rather than say what really interests [...]


    10. You might not be ready for some of the information in this book, but I think you should be be One example By asking how recently the people of Europe would have a common ancestor, he constructed a mathematical model that incorporated the number of ancestors an individual is presumed to have had each with two parents , and given the current population size, the point at which all those possible lines of ascent up the family trees would cross The answer was merely 600 years ago Sometime at the end [...]


    11. Genetically you are unique.However, there is nothing particularly special about being unique if everyone else is In your 23 base pairs of DNA there are around 20,000 human protein coding genes To put this in perspective, a banana has 36,000 The first complete draft of the sequence was published on February 12th 2001 Being able to read this code of T C G A s is one thing being able to understand it is another, and we are nowhere near being able to manipulate it yet either This code is what makes [...]


    12. I am interested in things like genetics and DNA, but what I knew about it I could have maybe fitted on a postage stamp Reading this book I learned quite a lot of new things that I didn t know First and for most, it is scientific I am sure you are thinking wellduhjust look at the subject matter but it is than that It also has a lot of history wrapped up in it as well, which for me made it a lot less dry than a regular science non fiction book.There was much covered in this book about where we al [...]


    13. Where did you come from Who are your ancestors Is there a queen, a president, or a pirate in your past Rutherford s answer to this last question is yes In the end, we are all interrelated because our gene pool working backwards was rather small For example, 23andMe tells me I am related to Marie Antoinette Rutherford suggests holding off on claiming royal property and privilege because so are millions of other people.Homo sapiens emerged from Africa at least years ago Neanderthals, Denisovans, a [...]


    14. Complex topic written in a way most people can understand without treating the reader as a fool, with plenty of humour added in for good measure Recommended for anyone with an interested in the subject.


    15. Genes change culture, culture changes genes.This is a fantastic story of what genetics has told us in the past 15 years and what it hasn t On the one hand it is full of completely surprising assertions That everyone with European blood is descended from Charlemagne was my favourite and that wasn t even shown by genetics, but by maths , or how much we were ourselves changed by the development of agriculture On the other hand, it admirably makes clear the lack of clarity in the vast mass of the hu [...]


    16. The who, the what, the when, the why, and the wheregarding life.This book tries to approach four of the aforementioned terms We don t know exactly why and I am not going to talk about the anthropic principle here Nevertheless, the lack of the fifth element doesn t make it a bad book It is a brilliant piece of work and am I thankful that I have been told to read it.The book is divided in two parts a part dedicated to the topic of how we came to be and a part regarding who are we now No part is a [...]


    17. When I saw the title A Brief History I didn t quite expect this book to be as long as it isat said, given it covers a huge portion of the history of humanity both as we know it and prior this is, indeed, relatively brief in comparison Before purchasing this book during an offer period so it was very very cheap I read some reviews both on here and on other sites A number of those reviews commented on the easy readability of the book given the source material I would generally disagree, this is a [...]


    18. A very readable overview of genetics for the layperson Very informative and clear, with a lot of excellent jokes including a fab Princess Bride gag slipped in there, and thorough in debunking a lot of the garbage talked about genetics In particular he s strong on race national identity as things which don t exist, and really good on the nonsense of claiming people can blame their genes for the criminal acts The chapter on inbreeding and the Hapsburgs was particularly good, although it ought to b [...]


    19. A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived was a disappointment The book is at least two drafts away from being ready for publication It reads as if dictated by a busy, distracted, garrulous man bent on clearing his calendar for a interesting and important project Disorganized Poorly edited Thin Thoughts are introduced but never elaborated fully A title in search of content I can t think why it has become so popular.


    20. I picked up this book because I had in mind to get current as a layman on the state of DNA research, after hearing so much hoopla about mapping of the human genome some years ago The epiphanies I hoped for never arrived That s not entirely Rutherford s fault As he points out in the book, it s a complex subject, and ancestry mapping is not the main point, there are bigger fish to fry, like treating or curing inherited disease Still, DNA research tells us a lot, but most of what Rutherford relates [...]


    21. Public DNA testing to determine one s ancestral origins and possibly find lost relatives has become something of a fad in recent years But to really understand our origins, as well as everyone else s, we need to move well beyond surface appearances and grasp the essence of what it means to be human, constructed as we are through the action of some 20,000 genes The first small group of distinct homo sapiens appeared some 200,000 years ago in east Africa and began their migration into the rest of [...]


    22. Wonderful book, very readable, about human genetics, and how closely all people around the globe are related to each other Look at everyone at the UN General Assembly and say to yourself Every single person there is my cousin


    23. Adam Rutherford s survey of our current understanding of genomics ought to be required reading for policy makers, educationalists and anyone else who thinks they might know what is best for society, because, as the author repeatedly demonstrates, almost everything we believe we instinctively understand about the heritability of those characteristics we either aspire to, or seek to eliminate, turns out to be wrong The architecture of the human genome, the subtle interactions between genotype and [...]


    24. The key idea that Rutherford unveils in this riveting volume is that human genomics the study of our DNA is radically altering our understanding of our own pastBut the desire to understand heritage, Rutherford reminds us, is an ancient desire and twisted into that desire are our concerns about identity and relationships, and our sense of selfAs Rutherford concludes, we cannot investigate heritage simply by studying DNA we also need to understand the social and political history of heritage In th [...]


    25. This is a fascinating history of human kind told through the evidence of our DNA The story is told in two parts, our history, how DNA analysis can support archaeology in showing how humans left Africa and interbred with Neanderthals, how some of us acquired fair skin, blue eyes and ginger hair How some of us evolved the ability to digest milk can also be seen through our DNA Rutherford explains the complexity of DNA analysis and how quickly it is advancing as a science The second part of the boo [...]


    26. Zaliczam j do swoich pozycji przeczytanych, ale fakty s takie, e miejscami omin am pewne jej fragmenty Zazwyczaj tego nie robi serio, nawet jak trafi s ab w moim mniemaniu cz ksi ki Ale w przypadku Kr tkiej historii zwyczajnie by am momentami przyt oczona ogromem wiedzy i zbiorem danych, kt re autor nam przekazywa.Stara si pisa lu no, by zainteresowa czytelnika i faktycznie zach ci go do tematu gen w i DNA powiedzcie szczerze ilu z was czuje dreszcze podniecenia na sam my l no w a nie I przez wi [...]


    27. The trouble with popular science books is that at some point they have to get down and dirty with real hard science, and however hard the author tries, and however skilled he is at making the difficult accessible, that s one big stumbling block for the non scientists out there I so wanted to be engaged with this book Genetics is important, right We need to understand the subject It explains our past and informs out future Adam Rutherford has no doubt done his best, but his best just isn t good [...]


    28. I will add my voice to the already voluminous praise this volume has received merely to say not only is Adam Rutherford a very engaging writer, books like this are necessary every so often to bring a mass audience up to speed on the genuine research going on in the field of genetics Being constantly bombarded with news that scientists have just discovered the gene for every possible personality and human action, it s nice to have a voice of reason amidst the pseudo scientific clickbait While I d [...]


    29. The first half of this book is a very current as of 2016 description of the pre history of homo, in particular homo sapiens based on genetic evidence, typically on the basis of DNA sequences taken from skeletal remains Which groups migrated from where to where and when The males of which population mixed with whose females and settled where I find this development extremely interesting, but clearly the current evidence is very scattered, both geographically and temporally, based on very fragment [...]


    30. A really interesting explanation of genetics for the lay person, informative and explained thoroughly in a way that s easy to understand The chapter about race was particularly interesting and anyone with an interest in race relations would do well to read it I was surprised to learn that the genetic difference between two black people from different parts of Sub Saharan Africa for instance and Ethiopian a and a Congolese person is greater than the genetic difference between, say, a black Ethiop [...]


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